About yeast intelligence

I have started to acknowledge more about the intelligence of other species and to respect different kind of intelligence not just human. I am wondering what kind of intelligence yeasts have? What is their purpose in nature?

I see a relation between yeast studies I have made and a dissertation by Jari Kärkkäinen called: “Intentional Minds – A Non-anthropocentric View on the Valuer and the Value of the Natural Complexes”.

This study from University of Cambridge has shown that yeast cells can be aware who they want to feed. Article is called: “Social yeast cells prefer to work with close relatives to make our beer, bread and wine -Sharing of nutrients between cells is so efficient that any deficiency is cancelled out”

Pictured is a two-day old yeast community that grows as a colony. Different colors indicate cells producing and consuming different metabolites and nutrients.
Credit: University of Cambridge

Baker´s yeast the community helps each other and protects the community. Study from University of Cambridge from 2015 has shown:

“Baker’s yeast cells living together in communities help feed each other, but leave incomers from the same species to die from starvation, according to new research from the University of Cambridge.” (Source: Science Daily)

Source: eLife. “Social yeast cells prefer to work with close relatives to make our beer, bread and wine: Sharing of nutrients between cells is so efficient that any deficiency is cancelled out.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 27 October 2015.

Importance of preserving biodiversity

Another study from Science Daily from 2015, called: “New yeast species travelled the globe with a little help from the beetles”

This new species demonstrates the importance of preserving biodiversity, as yeasts like this may help efforts to develop renewable fuel sources in the future.

Researchers from the National Collection of Yeast Cultures (NCYC) at the Institute of Food Research (IFR) have identified a new globe-trotting yeast species that lives on tree-associated beetles. This new species demonstrates the importance of preserving biodiversity, as yeasts like this may help efforts to develop renewable fuel sources in the future.

But their search for more yeasts to add to their collection continues. Conservative estimates put the current total number of yeast species at 150,000, and so far globally we’ve possibly discovered only 1% of this total. NCYC’s Ecuadorean collaboration has yielded dozens of new, as yet uncharacterised yeasts, and more extreme environments and habitats are currently being explored for the chance to find potentially useful yeasts. But unless we preserve those habitats, and the precious biodiversity they contain, we could lose that chance forever.

(Source: Science Daily)